A philosophical conundrum at the heart of the cranial debate: as explained by Professor Stephen Tyreman

A reminder of the great mind and gentle humanity of Stephen Tyreman.  I was honoured to be sent this to publish on the blog, and hope that through writings such as this, he can continue to enlighten and inform us.  He wrote it in response to a piece by Monica Noy on “cognitive dissonance”.  …

Advertisement

How to be an evidence-based cranial osteopath

The enigmatic case of cranial osteopathy: Evidence versus clinical practice Pages 1-4 IJOM September 2016 Rafael Zegarra-Parodi, Francesco Cerritelli Well, and doesn’t this sound intriguing?  It’s the opening piece in the most recent IJOM and seems to have been prompted by the big French physiotherapists’ study of Osteopathy in the Cranial Field (OCF).  The authors…

“Cranial osteopathy”: Can we get a few things clear

Time and time again I read something about “cranial osteopathy”, which seems to describe something which is nothing like what I do.  It is often assumed  that we sit there  “head-holding”.  I saw a description this week that we claim to”magnetize the blood”.  I’m not surprised that there is such confusion, even amongst osteopaths.  I…

Things I wish I’d said to Simon Singh

As someone who couldn’t even work Facebook nine months ago, it came as something of a shock to find I was involved in a Twitter spat with Simon Singh, one of osteopathy’s fiercest critics.  What next?  A public fracas with Richard Dawkins?  However several emails and a long phone call later, feathers were unruffled, a…

Calling all osteopaths – Ignore research at your peril

I received in my inbox today a message from the lovely Georgina Leelodharry.  She was reminding members of iO to make no unfounded claims for our treatments.  It appears that the Good Thinking Society is checking up on the accuracy of osteopaths’ claims about treating children.  This is not a bad thing and shouldn’t concern…